34: Matt McDowell - Fancy Latin words

Matt McDowell is an expert in electrochemical materials and devices. On this episode, we talk about everything batteries — how they work, the state-of-the-art, what still needs to be improved, and what options are on the table for future technologies. We also discuss Matt and his students’ use of in situ experiments — those able to make measurements of a device while it is operating — and how they use this capability to understand the atomic scale details that govern battery performance and failure. We also ponder if batteries will ever be used as the main source of energy in airplanes and, if so, what it will take to get there. (Recorded on February 1, 2018. Edited by Andrew Cannon)

33: Andrew Cannon - He's one of those scientists

This episode is dedicated to Lorrie Michele Parson.

Andrew Cannon started 1900 Engineering to commercialize a microcontact printing-based technology to map strain in high performance materials. His technology helps engineers understand when and how parts fatigue, knowledge that is critically important for industries ranging from aerospace to automotive. We talk about how 1900 Engineering's technology works and how the stamps are fabricated, but also discuss a number of the long-standing challenges to precision patterning at the micrometer and nanometer length scale. (Recorded on December 5, 2017. Edited by Andrew Cannon)

32: Stacey Bent - A Ph.D. thesis in Russia

Stacey Bent from Stanford University joins the podcast to talk about Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), a technique used to modify the composition and properties of surfaces. Since a large fraction of the atoms in nanostructures exist on the surface, ALD has become a quintessential tool for nanotechnologists. In this micro-episode, Stacey explains how ALD got its start, how it works, how the semiconductor industry accelerated its development, and what opportunities lie ahead. (Recorded on October 25, 2017. Edited by Andrew Cannon)

31: John Randall - The way I ended up being a nanofabricator

John Randall, the President of Zyvex Labs, joins the podcast to discuss his far reaching vision for nanotechnology and nanomanufacturing. We discuss what he calls Digital Atomic Scale Fabrication, the future products it might enable, the critical need for error correction, and why today's semiconductor manufacturers are unlikely to lead the way. John also shares a number of captivating stories from his career. (Recorded on September 14, 2017. Edited by Andrew Cannon)

30: Eric Furst - A crystalline solid of yummy, delicious chocolate

Eric Furst from the University of Delaware is an expert in self-assembly -- the Harry Potter-esque ability of materials to assemble themselves into well-defined structures. We talk about where we are, where we are going, and what makes controlling self-assembly so hard. A variety of topics make cameos, including M&Ms, NASA's Vomit Comet, flying solar cells, and more. (Recorded on April 19, 2017. Edited by Andrew Cannon)

29: Lynn Loo - You've just stepped on my soapbox

28: Dennis Hess - That's a big big number

Dennis Hess from the School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering at Georgia Tech joins the podcast to talk about the early days of the semiconductor industry. We discuss the birth of Fairchild Semiconductor, the so-called "traitorous eight," and their groundbreaking process innovations that still underlie integrated circuit manufacturing. (Recorded on January 31, 2017. Edited by Andrew Cannon.)

27: Bara Cola - Naive is not a strong enough word

Bara Cola makes an encore appearance on the podcast to chat about Carbice, a company he founded to commercialize next generation heat transfer materials for cooling electronic devices. We discuss the value and challenge of maintaining business relationships, how competition from abroad is changing the playing field for technology start-ups, and the excitement surrounding a number of carbon nanotube-based products now making their way to the market. (Recorded on January 26, 2017)

26: Jen Dionne - The light at the end of the tunnel

25: Vivian Ferry - What constraints are really constraints?